• Spinal Cord Injury

    Spinal cord injury can result in paralysis of the muscles used for breathing; paralysis and/or loss of feeling in all or some of the trunk, arms, and legs; weakness; numbness; loss of bowel and bladder control; and numerous secondary conditions including respiratory problems, pressure sores, and sometimes fatal spikes in blood pressure. Approximately 12,000 new spinal cord injuries occur in the U.S. each year. A majority of injuries occur from motor vehicle accidents, falls, work-related accidents, sports injuries, and penetrations such as stab or gunshot wounds.

  • Our Membership Community

    Our membership community provides a lifeline for many individuals that are focused on regaining their independence and improving their quality of life––whether they are leaving rehab after sustaining a spinal cord injury, learning to live with symptoms of a spinal cord disorder, or have spent years of frustration coping with disability. We provide members guidance and resources on a variety of topics they are passionate about, such as employment, affordable housing, transportation, health care, home- and community-based independent living, education, peer support, and leisure and recreation.

  • Ask Us

    United Spinal’s Ask Us program connects you with information, resources, and access to our “Ask Us Spinal Cord Central” help center. Browse the Knowledge Books below for answers to your questions. If you can’t find what you are looking for just Ask Us and one of our knowledgeable staff will provide you with answers.

  • You are here >>:
  • /United Spinal News Archives
  • /New Hampshire Chapter: Partnering for Success

New Hampshire Chapter: Partnering for Success

WHIMN_handcyclingAs Carol Conforti-Adams of the United Spinal New Hampshire Chapter recovered from being paralyzed in a 2002 car accident, she began to feel a desperate need to do something with her life.

She was in her 40s and had spent a large portion of her career working in the hospital business, focusing on promoting health and wellness. She had seen first-hand the potential value of social exercise groups when she launched an award-winning program for seniors called HOP (Healthy Old People). As she began to understand the needs of the wheelchair-using community, she wondered whether a similar program could work for it.

The WHIM group rests after a hike on the Crotched Mountain accessible trail. The WHIM group rests after a hike on the Crotched Mountain accessible trail.
 

The result became Wheelchair Health in Motion, a unique blend of peer support groups and exercise that is quickly spreading throughout New Hampshire. The New Hampshire chapter of United Spinal collaborates closely with WHIM, and chapter president Mark Race is one of the seven trained peers who leads a regular weekly group at HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital in Concord. He got to know Conforti-Adams when she served on an advisory committee for the chapter. He says the program’s mix of socializing and exercise can be nothing short of life changing.

“I’ve seen people come in who looked like they were beaten down by life and turn around in a couple of months and leave with a newfound confidence in life,” he says. The benefits go beyond confidence and attitude. Race mentions one attendee with cerebral palsy who started coming. “At the time, he had a tracheotomy and a vent,” he says. “Through exercising and learning about proper nutrition and exercising at home, he is no longer vent dependent.”

From handcycling to hiking to watersports, WHIM is always coming up with fun activities for its members to enjoy. It’s WHIM’s mix of socializing and exercizing together that proves to be nothing short of life changing. From handcycling to hiking to watersports, WHIM is always coming up with fun activities for its members to enjoy. It’s WHIM’s mix of socializing and exercizing together that proves to be nothing short of life changing.
 

The free sessions consist of an extensive regimen of upper body stretches and exercises specifically designed for wheelchair users. Peer leaders receive training and are given a 100-page manual that Conforti-Adams developed for the program. “We spent a lot of time developing a manual, and we made sure it was reviewed by neurologists, physical therapists and occupational therapists,” she says. “That was really important to me because of my background in health. We wanted to make sure that the exercises we were promoting were actually beneficial to people with spinal cord injuries.”

“The great thing about WHIM is that anybody can do it,” says Race. “There’s a lot of repetition, but in a fun way. Everybody does it to the level they can. Whether you do a little or a lot, you just have to start.”

Conforti-Adams has been thrilled to watch the program expand to four locations and serve a growing number of people, with as many as 15 attending some of Race’s Concord sessions, but she still sees room for growth and improvement.

WHIM_water“It hasn’t yet surpassed what I expected because I’d love to have more community,” she says. “It has brought me more awareness about how difficult it is for people to get out there because of their social and economic situations.”

With no local accessible public transportation options, Race says many attendees rely on local independent living organizations for rides, even though they only receive as few as two rides per month. “The chance to be among their peers, to work out and to have fun is a huge draw,” says Race, who works as the peer support supervisor for Granite State Independent Living.

WHIM-hikeWHIM is currently offered in four New Hampshire locations, but Conforti-Adams says she is open to and excited about the possibility of expanding the program beyond the Granite state’s boundaries.

“I fully believe it’s something that can be duplicated with a small amount of time and energy,” she says.

For more information on Wheelchair Health in Motion, call 603/938-2562 or visit www.sheinh.org/index.php/whim.

Guidestar Exchange Gold Participant
BBB Accredited Charity